Tuesday, 23 May 2017

[HM:258593] New Tech Uses WiFi and Holograms to Let You “See” Through Walls

In Brief

German scientists from the Technical University of Munich have developed an imaging technology that uses Wi-Fi signals to construct 3D hologram images. This could be used to assist in search and rescue operations after disasters.

A Whole New View

If you've played any of the recent Batman video games, you're probably already familiar with his ability to scan through walls using one of the many gadgets he has at his disposal. In real life, German scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) may have developed a technology that could give you a similar Batman-esque skill. What makes it even cooler? Basically all it takes is a Wi-Fi signal.

"It can basically scan a room with someone's Wi-Fi transmission," Philipp Holl said, speaking to Business Insider. Holl and TUM professor Friedemann Reinhard developed the concept behind the technology and published their findings in the journal Physical Review Letters.

It's surprisingly simple, exploiting Wi-Fi's ability to pass through walls. Using two antennas, they record a Wi-Fi field around a particular room. The antennas capture the intensity and the phase of the Wi-Fi field both from its source spot and the places it bounces off from. The result is a holographic image of the room that, while it's not yet vivid, proves that the concept works in practice rather than just theory.

Life-Saving Tech

The ability to see through walls might be a little unsettling at first, as it could open up potential privacy exploitation issues. "Of course, this raises privacy questions. After all, to a certain degree even encrypted signals transmit an image of their surroundings to the outside world," Reinhard said in a press release from TUM, "However, it is rather unlikely that this process will be used for the view into foreign bedrooms in the near future. For that, you would need to go around the building with a large antenna, which would hardly go unnoticed. There are simpler ways available."

The tech could also have many beneficial — if not life-saving — applications. Apart from the potential to be used by spy agencies for legitimate operations requiring the scanning of buildings, it could also be an asset to rescue operations after a disaster such as an earthquake or an avalanche. The antennas could be placed in a truck and then driven around the rubble or debris are to survey and look for survivors.

"These antennas don't need to be big. They can be very small, like the ones in a smartphone," Holl said, meaning they could be easily wielded even in the smallest, most remote, spaces.

Further research, such as on the transparency of specific materials, is needed to refine the technology. But it's exciting to think that superhero technology could come to life in such a way, especially with potentially life-saving applications.

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[HM:258592] Future Story: New York To Hong Kong In 2050

 

by Bill Danon

 

Everyone knows that the future of transportation involves self-driving cars, and they're coming to a ride-sharing service near you, possibly sooner than you think. But what other transportation technologies will transform the future of travel?

Based on expert predictions about autonomous vehicles, supersonic jet travel, robotics, artificial intelligence, and other innovations, the travel experience described below is rooted in the real emerging technologies of today—plus a healthy dose of speculative extrapolation for how future travel technology will evolve over the next 30-plus years.

 

Here, allow yourself to take a journey into the future—on a trip from New York to Hong Kong, circa 2050—to see what's in store.

 

Packed and Off You Go

Your suitcases are packed, and you're ready to leave your Brooklyn home, so you summon a ride: It's a self-driving taxi. When it arrives two minutes later, it does not look like any Ford, BMW, or Tesla of today. The interior has only two plush, swiveling seats—no steering wheel, gas pedals, or dashboard. The windows double as transparent screens, displaying map, weather, and road-condition data, as well as news and entertainment feeds.

 

En Route, Sans Driver

As you ride along, the near-silent electric car is being charged via magnetic induction in the roadway. Your taxi joins up with a chain of other self-driving cars to form a fast-moving train on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. The tightly packed vehicles reduce traffic and air resistance. Though there are no speed limits and no traffic police, the car chugs along at just 50 mph, and you still arrive at New York City's LaGuardia Airport in half the time it took in the 2010s. Why? For one, there are few remaining traffic lights. Most intersections now are roundabouts that allow for continuous movement of cars, scooters, and bikes. Pedestrians pass overhead on footbridges.

 

Airport Arrival

Since completing a multibillion dollar renovation in 2021, LaGuardia has been on the cutting edge of how digital and physical technologies intersect for air travel. When you arrive, a robotic porter greets you and takes your luggage to an artificial-intelligence system that sorts and routes baggage to the appropriate aircraft.

Courtesy Redshift

 

The system detects the electronic wafer you 3D printed at home and packed in your suitcase. With an app on your mobile device, you can track your suitcase on a high-resolution 3D map of the building and, later, the aircraft itself.

 

On the 8G network of 2050, these superdetailed, terabyte-size 3D models load in milliseconds. Thanks to CT scans and facial recognition, you barely slow down (and get to keep your shoes on) while breezing through the security check.

 

At Maximum Altitude

Your flight is on a new generation of supersonic commercial jets powered by a combination of fuel cells and solar energy. It was generatively designed using a descendent of Autodesk's Project Dreamcatcher software, which was first commercialized in 2017. And the fuselage is a lattice of superlightweight carbon fiber and transparent material.

Screens embedded in the windows provide readouts from all the sensors you wish to see. Of course, no pilot is flying the plane, but 90 percent of commercial flights as far back as 2010 operated on autopilot, so this is nothing new. In fact, there's no pilot on the plane at all; the flight is being guided by a space-based air-traffic-control system. But rest assured: There are pilots who can take control of the plane from remote stations on the ground, should the need arise.

 

A Dose of Caffeine Upon Arrival

When you arrive in Hong Kong, there's no need to wait at the baggage carousel. After you clear passport control—again sped up by facial recognition—another robotic porter matches the silicon wafer in your suitcase with your mobile device and delivers your baggage while you sip an espresso. You consider grabbing some dim sum for breakfast at the Michelin-starred restaurant in the terminal, but you need to get to Guanghzou for a meeting.

 

Faster Than a Speeding Bullet

Thirty years ago, you would have taken a ferry or a conventional train to get to Guanghzou on the Chinese mainland. The train would have taken about two hours to make the 180 km (112 mile) trip. But you're not traveling by train; you're taking the Hyperloop—the bullet-like, vacuum-sealed levitating pod originally conceived by Elon Musk way back in the summer of 2013. It takes only nine minutes traveling at 1,200 km/hr (745 mph) to reach Guanghzou.

Almost There

As you exit the Hyperloop terminal, you still need to travel 2 km (1.25 miles) to your hotel to freshen up before your meeting. Lucky for you, the past 30 years have seen an explosion of electric-powered microvehicles perfect for navigating dense urban areas. You wave your device at the checkout kiosk; pause for a retinal scan to confirm your identity; and, voilà, off you go on a rented Floatility electric scooter.

 

Courtesy Redshift

 

Hotel at Last (With a Drone Assist)

All has gone swimmingly so far, but while en route to your hotel, you realize you left your carry-on bag (with crucial items for your meeting) at the airport. Thankfully, you're able to summon a drone delivery service to retrieve the bag and deliver it to your hotel. It's downstairs waiting for you when you return to the lobby after a quick shower, and now you're ready to tackle the day.

 

Well, that was certainly enjoyable. You went halfway around the world in comfort and style, emitting a tiny fraction of carbon dioxide that the same trip would have created 30 years earlier. What you may not have realized (because why would you?) is that the seeds of all these technologies are already well in the works, as is the software that's required to make them.

In 2017, designers and engineers can already use generative design to create things like self-driving cars, lightweight airplanes, luggage robots, and Hyperloop infrastructure. And some are already 3D printing working circuitry and building machine-learning Internet of Things systems. It's the work being done today that will make this amazing experience of 2050 a reality in the future of travel.

 

(Illustration images: Courtesy Redshift. Top image credit: Getty Images)

This article originally appeared on Autodesk's Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders and makers.

Bill Danon is a public relations director at Autodesk.

All views expressed are those of the author.

 


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Friday, 12 May 2017

Re: [HM:258591] Business: What Is an Operational Framework?

​Glad to know :)
Thanks​


On 12 May 2017 at 09:51, Manoj Srivastava <mkslko@gmail.com> wrote:
very informative,
Thanks Junaid ji



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Thursday, 11 May 2017

Re: [HM:258590] Business: What Is an Operational Framework?

very informative,
Thanks Junaid ji

On Thu, May 11, 2017 at 4:54 PM, Junaid Tahir <mjunaidtahir@gmail.com> wrote:

An operation framework sets out an organization's policies and procedures, such as management structure. 

An operational framework is a guide to a company's policies, goals, standards, procedures and training. The framework sets out the way the company does business and promotes a corporate culture and identity. An operational framework may also include principles of good governance and set out company values and divisions within the firm. Each operational framework contains different elements.

Organization

The operational framework generally describes the corporate organization or management structure. This includes how leaders will govern the company and the hierarchy of its divisions or management teams. For example, the framework may set out the levels of management, from the CEO to department heads and ordinary managers. Accompanying this might be a chart illustrating the corporate hierarchy. In smaller firms, this section might simply state the corporate structure, such as owner-operator.

Policies

The operational framework will generally outline company policies. These can include guiding principles on behavior, employment and promotion. It might also contain general guidelines for all employees to follow. These can include directives such as always act with fairness and integrity, support roles must be adequately staffed and responsive, always use good governance and risk management procedures and managers will have an open-door policy. These guidelines are in the operational framework to establish and develop a company ethos and culture. The document might also outline which markets the company will target and where it will focus research and development spending.

Processes and Procedures

Most companies include guidelines for core processes and procedures in their operational frameworks. The framework does not generally list exact instructions for processes, such as how to operate various types of equipment. Instead, it sets guidelines for broader matters, such as how to conduct business planning and when to do an audit. The framework might have procedures for managing workflow, policies for bidding on contracts and for allocating assets to company divisions. It may also include specific information on procedures for hiring, facilities management and customer relations.

Multiple Frameworks

Companies might have more than one operational framework. An organization might develop a framework to achieve a particular goal. For example, in 2011, the private sector arm of the World Bank set out a sustainability framework that established goals and procedures for fostering growth in developing countries by financing private sector investments. The company might design a green framework, stating environmental goals for each section of the business. An innovations framework may outline policies, procedures and management changes the company will use to achieve innovation and growth.

About the Author

Since graduating with a degree in biology, Lisa Magloff has worked in many countries. Accordingly, she specializes in writing about science and travel and has written for publications as diverse as the "Snowmass Sun" and "Caterer Middle East." With numerous published books and newspaper and magazine articles to her credit, Magloff has an eclectic knowledge of everything from cooking to nuclear reactor maintenance.

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[HM:258589] Business: What Is an Operational Framework?

An operation framework sets out an organization's policies and procedures, such as management structure. 

An operational framework is a guide to a company's policies, goals, standards, procedures and training. The framework sets out the way the company does business and promotes a corporate culture and identity. An operational framework may also include principles of good governance and set out company values and divisions within the firm. Each operational framework contains different elements.

Organization

The operational framework generally describes the corporate organization or management structure. This includes how leaders will govern the company and the hierarchy of its divisions or management teams. For example, the framework may set out the levels of management, from the CEO to department heads and ordinary managers. Accompanying this might be a chart illustrating the corporate hierarchy. In smaller firms, this section might simply state the corporate structure, such as owner-operator.

Policies

The operational framework will generally outline company policies. These can include guiding principles on behavior, employment and promotion. It might also contain general guidelines for all employees to follow. These can include directives such as always act with fairness and integrity, support roles must be adequately staffed and responsive, always use good governance and risk management procedures and managers will have an open-door policy. These guidelines are in the operational framework to establish and develop a company ethos and culture. The document might also outline which markets the company will target and where it will focus research and development spending.

Processes and Procedures

Most companies include guidelines for core processes and procedures in their operational frameworks. The framework does not generally list exact instructions for processes, such as how to operate various types of equipment. Instead, it sets guidelines for broader matters, such as how to conduct business planning and when to do an audit. The framework might have procedures for managing workflow, policies for bidding on contracts and for allocating assets to company divisions. It may also include specific information on procedures for hiring, facilities management and customer relations.

Multiple Frameworks

Companies might have more than one operational framework. An organization might develop a framework to achieve a particular goal. For example, in 2011, the private sector arm of the World Bank set out a sustainability framework that established goals and procedures for fostering growth in developing countries by financing private sector investments. The company might design a green framework, stating environmental goals for each section of the business. An innovations framework may outline policies, procedures and management changes the company will use to achieve innovation and growth.

About the Author

Since graduating with a degree in biology, Lisa Magloff has worked in many countries. Accordingly, she specializes in writing about science and travel and has written for publications as diverse as the "Snowmass Sun" and "Caterer Middle East." With numerous published books and newspaper and magazine articles to her credit, Magloff has an eclectic knowledge of everything from cooking to nuclear reactor maintenance.

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Tuesday, 9 May 2017

[HM:258588] How to Be Assertive

How to Be Assertive Without Being Too Aggressive

Have you ever been in a situation where you are in a group whose opinions are not aligned with yours? What did you do? Did you keep quiet or did you express your opinions just as they express themselves?

Assertiveness is a skill of those people who can express themselves straightforwardly, without stepping on the rights of others. However, not everyone knows the importance of assertiveness for both personal and professional lives. Some people find it difficult to be assertive. But what most of us don't know is that assertiveness is not a unique trait a person can possess that others don't have. It is actually a skill which we can learn. read some articles on professionalism on www.dailytenminutes.com

Why Do Some People Find It Hard To Be Assertive

To be assertive requires three points of the triangle; the passive, aggressive and assertive . You need to find the right mix of these three important points to be assertive.

The Passive

When we were kids, adults always taught us to be kind and friendly to other kids. Most of us have adapted this teaching to a point where we oftentimes become hesitant to express our opinions and thoughts. We believe that it is not nice to argue and disagree with others.

We develop a passive behavior because we are programmed to believe that those who goes out of the norm and are not afraid to say what they want to say are rude, disrespectful and are often rejected. But what you don't know is that by being passive no one else gets upset but you. We are stepping into our own rights and it can negatively impact our self-confidence.

The Aggressive

Completely opposite to being passive, aggressive people tend to fail in considering other people's rights and feelings. They are not aware that by expressing their opinions, they have undermined the self-esteem and the rights of others.

Aggressive behaviors come in so many ways. By simply demanding someone rather than asking, rushing them or ignoring them, we are encouraging them to be passive while we become aggressive. read more articles on confidence by visiting www.dailytenminutes.com

The Assertive

Assertiveness is finding the right balance between being passive and being aggressive. It is a two-way communication where we can convey our message and listen to others as well. It encourages an exchange of views so the rights of both parties are exercised and opinions and feelings are expressed appropriately. It means sharing, appreciating others and seeing them as an equal.

It can be a struggle finding the right balance. Our current roles, past experiences, how we view ourselves, the stress we experience and our incorrect assumption that these traits are by nature affect our responses and our communication with others. But if we become self-aware and we open our minds, we will realize how important it is to learn how to be assertive.

How Can Being Assertive Help Our Professional And Personal Lives?

As mentioned earlier, assertiveness can provide significant growth both in our professional and personal lives. Forbes reported 1that leaders who are assertive are perceived to have higher integrity than those who are not. Also, it is vital for an organization to have a team of assertive individuals that promote cooperation, support, unity, training and developments . This is to successfully establish an effective project management process which is essential for project success.

When it comes to our personal development, assertiveness sure helps a lot. Here are some of them.

Provide Yourself More Value. Assertiveness increases self-confidence and improves self-image. You develop the awareness that you have are not only entitled to your own opinions, but you have the right to express them. Also, you adopt a more realistic view of yourself.

You Learn To Value Others. Rather than seeing other people as a threat, an assertive behavior allows you to see them in a realistic context. You understand the individualities of a person and you see them as collaborators which can help you achieve things.

Gives You An Opportunity To Achieve More. When you convey your message appropriately and clearly, you never have to worry about unresolved issues or not being able to please other people. You can channel your effort and time for more worthy things which can help you unleash your full potential.

Overall, one major benefit of being assertive is that it allows us to h ave a healthy relationship with other people while improving ourselves. It may not be easy, but over time, we can learn to develop this behavior.

So, What Does It Takes To Be Assertive?

Each person has different ways of developing assertiveness in them. For others, it can be pretty easy, while for some it may require them a lot of efforts to be assertive. But here are some tips we can work on to develop our assertiveness.

Know Your Value As A Person

Never allow other people to let you feel less important as them. Don't allow them to make you feel inferior. Understand that your opinions, thoughts, feelings and your right to express them are as valuable as others.

We have a full control of ourselves. Some people may treat us poorly because they can see us doing that on our own selves. That gives them permission to treat us the way they do. Our confidence, energy and our attitude convey a message to people. These trigger their actions towards us.

If they see us as someone who has high regard of ourselves and someone who knows how to protect our rights and dignity, they will treat us as such as well. So it all starts with ourselves. When we know our value as a person, people will start to see us as their equal.

Identify Your Needs And Wants And Address Them

If you wait for people to address and satisfy your needs, you might wait for forever. Be independent. You need to put yourself in action to satisfy your own needs and wants. Moreover, when you learn to work towards satisfying your needs, you are more likely to reach your true potential and you become self-fulfilled. Thus, you boost your self-confidence and self-esteem.

However, in your desire to achieve your goals, do not forget that there are limitations. Do not be over-fixated with your dreams that you ignore and undermine other people's rights. They too have to work for their own desires so make sure you don't sacrifice other people's needs to achieve yours.

Acknowledge The Fact That You Have No Control Of People's Response

As the cliché saying goes, "you can't please everyone". You are not responsible for other people's response towards your actions. So stop fretting about upsetting them because of your assertive behavior.

We are only responsible for our actions. We should not concede to their wants and needs for as long as we are not violating their rights and feelings. If they don't like how we assert our own views and opinions, it is not our responsibility.

Express And Accept Criticisms In An Appropriate Manner

We have an imperfect life and that is why we give criticisms to others and receive criticisms as well. It is important that we should learn how to express negative thoughts to others in a way that we don't violate their rights. Point mistakes and opinions, but express it in a way that it will be useful for the improvement and development of that certain person.

Likewise, when we receive criticisms, we should not take it personally. It's okay to be upset or angry for a moment, but we should never lose our respect for the person. Instead, let's view criticisms as a useful feedback which we can use for our personal or professional growth.

Say "No" When You Feel It's Not Right For You

We always have to go for what's right for us. We can't just go with other people's demand, especially if it is not aligned with our principles. If we do, we are losing our self-worth. We should always remember that it's okay not no please everyone for as long as we are not stepping on their rights. But, if there is really a need to do things which are beyond our capabilities, we can learn to find other alternatives to meet halfway and provide a win-win solution.

Learning how to be assertive is not as complicated as we think. It may take some time to master assertiveness, but with constant practice, we can slowly make a transition. So give it a try and who knows, sooner or later, you will enjoy the long-term benefits of being assertive.

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Thursday, 4 May 2017

[HM:258587] How to Develop Kids' Self Control Without Scolding Them


If you were sitting in a room with a 5 layer chocolate cake and told not to touch it, could you resist the temptation? Would you sniff it? Maybe even skim some of the icing off with your finger? According to Laura Markham Ph.D. of Psychology Today1, "Only 30% of 4 year olds can manage their emotions, anxiety and impulses to resist temptation." Why should that matter? How you deal with self-control when you are four will determine whether or not the adult you can resist the urge to taste that chocolate cake.

Self-control is also known as self-restraint, or "the ability to regulate one's thoughts and behavior in the face of temptation and impulses," according Wikipedia2. Self-control mastered in childhood prevents problems arising in adulthood.

Why it's difficult to learn self-control

In today's instant-gratification society, anything you need is at the touch of a finger. You switch on the television with a remote. You don't have to wait for your favorite program, you stream it. You buy passes to by-pass the long lines at amusement parks. Microwaves heat your food up instantly, and when your out and hungry, you grab some fast food. Fast, convenient and no waiting, but at what cost?

Kids enter a world where waiting is minimal and tempers in these volatile times run high. People scream at each other on television, from their cars- and even in public. They rage at their governments by destroying other people's property. Kids grasp concepts by example and society provides a poor one. However, scolding your child for their lack of self-control will do no one any favors, as this necessary soft skill needs to be learned.

Why learning self-control is essential for kids

Kids need to start learning self-control when they are young. The prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part used to regulate self-control3, develops slowly in children and they, in turn, have the ability to take in this soft skill in stages in accordance to their growth.

A toddler, though unable to understand complex issues to them like waiting for cookies to finish baking in an oven, can be distracted, setting a foundation for building self-distraction as a coping mechanism for self-control. However, a five year old can sit in a time out to calm down and know why they are in that time out, and a teen can be taught to think twice about a reaction if the consequences mean losing that Friday night at a friend's house.4

How to help your kids learn self-control

1. Be a Good Role Model

You are the best model for your child to learn self-control. They will take their cues from how you act and react to situations. Do you lose your temper in the car and shout at other drivers? Keep calm and your child will learn to do the same.

2. Develop Trust Bonds

In order for kids to learn self-control, they need to know you have their back. If they already know they have dinner at home at 6, they will feel less compelled to grab that candy at 5:30. They trust you will feed them at 6, and having that sense of trust is essential in developing self-control. Provide a safe, warm, loving environment in which they can learn and thrive.

3. Teach Through Games

Younger kids learn self-control techniques best through play5. Games like Red-Light Green-Light or musical chairs teach them that have to control themselves. They have to stop themselves from grabbing that chair while the music is still going, or stop and freeze when they hear that "red-light" command. They are playing yet learning vital impulse control at the same time.

4. Use Delayed Gratification

Waiting is essential for self-control. Bake with your kids. With a timer to set- they have anticipation. The cake/cookies/brownies will be done by X amount of time. This helps them practice delayed gratification. You can use this too by not buying them something they badly want and tell them they must wait for their birthday or Christmas.

5. Tell Them About Consequences for Actions

Teaching kids they have consequences for their actions is essential in self-control. Instead of scolding them for their bad behavior, tell them you are taking away their electronics/favorite toy/ for X amount of time because of the behavior. Yelling does no one favors and only escalates the situation, but losing television privileges for a week will make them think twice next time.

6. Use Meditation

Recently, some schools have adopted the practice of using meditation to help with lack of behavior issues, instead of suspension and detention and their successes are astounding6. Much like a time-out, but focused, meditation helps children to master self control, gain inner calmness, and alleviate anxiety. Regular meditation also teaches the practitioner not to react impulsively to situations.

You can start your kids mediating- a minute a day to begin with. There are audios available for mindful meditation- guided with a voice to help kids think about their life, or just use soft music or silence. Have them focus on their breath- breathing in and out. And set a timer. Sometimes using an object to direct their focus on helps as well, like a candle or a rock.

Save your larynx, and stop yelling at the kids for their lack of self-control. Instead teach them this essential soft skill, by incorporating lessons of impulse control, delayed gratification, consequences into your daily life. Be a good role model and develop a trust bond and begin meditating. It will make your life easier and less stressful and help build a stronger foundation for your kids and their future- and maybe even help them resist the temptation to eat that chocolate cake!

References

[1]Psychology Today: 8 Steps to Help Your Child Develop Self Control [2]Wikipedia: Self Control [3]Standford.edu: Self Control and The Developing Brain [4]KidsHealth.org : Teaching Your Child Self-Control [5]Parentingscience.org: Teaching Self Control [6] Newsweek.com: The Movement of Meditation Replacing Detention in Schools


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[HM:258586] If You Want to Be Successful at Work, Polish Your Communication Skills First



Most of us spend the majority of our day communicating with people at work, but we rarely stop and think about whether or not we're actually good at communication.

With any other skill, you'd be constantly looking for ways to grow and develop.

So why not communication?

It's been shown that businesses with effective communication are 50% more likely to have lower employee turnover 1. Good communication skills also make work more enjoyable, reduce the risk of projects going wrong, and reduce workplace conflicts.

It takes hard work and dedication to learn to communicate well. Start with the essential workplace communication skills below. We'll talk about

  • How to manage conflict
  • How to listen better
  • How to deal with cultural differences
  • How to receive criticism
  • How to give helpful feedback

How to manage conflict

Managing conflict at work is all about staying calm, listening carefully to everyone's point of view, and being as understanding as possible 2. Next time you're hit with a difficult conflict at work, try the following steps:

  • Stay calm. If possible, take a short break from the conflict and do something relaxing/fun, like meditating, reading or taking a short walk. You'll be better able to deal with the issue when you're not angry or annoyed.
  • Listen. Give everyone involved in the conflict a chance to state their case. Use active listening techniques, like repeating part of what somebody says back to them, to show that you're fully engaged.
  • Be understanding. Show that you can empathise with your coworkers. Instead of saying, "Why wasn't the report finished on time?", say something like, "I understand that you've had a lot on your plate and might be struggling."
  • Never make it personal. Instead of saying, "You're always late to meetings!", say, "It's really important that we start the meeting on time."
  • Find a solution together. By getting everyone involved in working out a solution, nobody will feel they've been treated unfairly. Once the issue is worked out, do something positive together, like having a coffee or watching a funny video. It's always best to end on a positive note.

How to listen better

Active listening in the workplace is really important. Try the following techniques to ensure you don't appear bored or disinterested when talking to others 3.

  • smile and look at face. Staring off into space is a big no-no.
  • Check your posture. Face towards the person you're speaking to, maybe leaning forward slightly or turning your head to one side.
  • Ask questions. This shows that you're actively engaged and thinking deeply about what's being said to you.
  • Repeat or summarize information. This reassures the listener that you're paying attention and understanding fully.

How to deal with cultural differences

Having a diverse range of employees can be really good for a company, but can also cause issues. You might find that members of the team have different ideas about what's acceptable and what's not. Head off any potential problems by keeping communication open, emphasising the positives of having a team made up of so many unique individuals, and catering to the cultural needs of every employee.

How to receive criticism

Receiving criticism can be really tough, especially when you've worked hard on a project. Make the process easier by following these steps.

  • Remember that it's nothing personal. Even the most successful people make mistakes, and this is how we grow and improve.
  • Focus on constructive criticism. If you receive a comment that doesn't help you to improve, ignore it. Focus on criticism that actually helps you.
  • Make a plan. Break down what you need to do to improve into small, simple steps. That might mean rewriting the report one section at a time, taking a course to improve your skills, or asking for more support at work.

How to give helpful feedback

Giving feedback sometimes feels as hard as receiving it – nobody wants to hurt a coworkers feelings. When giving feedback be clear and concise – get to the point, rather than skirting around the issue. Make comments with the intention of helping your coworker, rather than insulting them. Instead of saying, "Your formatting is all wrong," say, "This would look even better with the correct formatting." Avoiding words like 'you' makes your coworker feel less attacked.

Good communication skills are essential regardless of where you work. Start learning now and you'll be in for a much easier and more enjoyable career.

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[HM:258585] A Smile a Day Keeps Sadness Away


By Dr Mansoor Anwar, Dubai

What makes you happy? A question answered more than 45 years ago by our beloved founding father his highness sheikh Zayed bin sultan alnayhan. He demonstrated the answer practically by creating the happiest, most tolerant nation on this planet, United Arab Emirates.

After thousands of research in the field of happiness, no agreement has reached yet to define it. It is a concept that reshapes itself and assume different colors in every society. However, there are some common principles that when adhering to them helps us to live a meaningfully positive life.

Health is one principle. Whether eating wisely, moving regularly or sleeping peacefully, being healthy allows the body cells to renew quickly and inject positive energy to the mind. The mental positive energy works like a cushion that protects the individual during moments of hardship especially in the workplace where a daily dose of positivity is crucial to spread happiness among all.

Another important principle is mindfulness. When was the last time you enjoyed a meal or a beautiful scene? Can you remember a work incident where you controlled your emotions and found a positive excuse for your colleague? Being mindful is the art of living the moment and recognizing our emotions. In many instances, we personalize the situation and assume the negative outcome. Rewiring the brain to wear the positive lens is one of the most difficult mental exercises but once mastered it create oasis of happiness and makes us positively contagious.

Why do we work? One of the most powerful happiness principles is the sense of purpose. It creates an ongoing momentum and refuels the mind with positivity. The challenge is to keep the "why" question positively alive before every work decision we make. We through blames on each other, give excuses, delay delivery, forgetting in the middle of all this that our ancestors shed their sweat answering the why and worked with passion despite all the obstacles.

However, the mother of all happiness principles is gratitude. A tool that makes every single breath you take a blessing. With the spread of social media, our comparison criteria shifted to what we do not have versus what others have. This created waves of anxiety, depression and envy both in personal and work life. Colleagues became distant and workplaces became cold. Practicing gratitude and counting what went well at the end of each day shall help equip the mind with resilience & fight the negativity of the comparison dilemma.

Using the above principles, we will charge our workplaces with positivity and fill our workers with happiness, and as his highness Sheikh Mohammed bn Rashid almaktoum said " in order to make your customers happy, you have to make your employees happy".


Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com

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